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December 2020

  /    /  December

It's been rough year for all of us – and it's not your imagination. 2020 has been so bizarre, it feels wrong not to at least do a quick run-through. 2020 brought us COVID, masks, quarantine, staying home and the negative health effects of isolation and loneliness. There have been massive business closures, record-setting unemployment, the police murders of Breonna Taylor and George Floyd and ensuing global protests, raging forest fires and hurricanes and nonstop election and political madness, misinformation posing as news, hospitals overflowing, and of course over 341,000 American deaths from COVID-19 — a loss of life equivalent of a new 9/11 every 24 hours. Good things happened in 2020 too It hasn't been all bad though. We learned about dogs being trained to protect rhinos from poachers have saved saved 45 rhinos in South Africa. People around the world rose up to protest police violence and racial injustice. Thanks to stay-at-home orders, animal shelters are more empty than ever. The 2020 election saw the most voter participation in 120 years. And of course, we now have a COVID-19 vaccine. Focus on making 2021 better All that being said, it's still the season for thinking about New Year resolutions and planning for the upcoming year. Most people think about the usual things: losing weight, learning to live in the moment, etc. but our mission is to encourage disabled individuals who use Service Dogs to leave nothing but an excellent impression. Here are 10 ways to be a better Service Dog team in the coming year. 1) Be polite and make an effort to educate others if you can If you've been partnered with a Service Dog long enough, chances are excellent that you will have run into an access challenge, someone who is rude, secretly (or openly) jealous that you have your dog with you — or just behaves awkwardly toward you or your canine partner. Perhaps they'll ask invasive questions. If you have an invisible disability, they may wonder aloud why "you don't look disabled" or even openly confront you. Chances are they have never met a Service Dog team before. It's possible that they have an image in their mind of what a disabled person with a Service Dog should look like. While having a Service Dog does not also require you to take on the role of Public Educator (and nor does everyone have time, especially when you're tired of being confronted

The holiday season is a perfect excuse to grab some hot chocolate and snuggle up on the couch with your Service Dog, Working Dog or pet! Here are some of our favorites that are sure to get you in the holiday spirit. 1. A Dog Named Christmas   A Dog Named Christmas tells the story of Todd, a developmentally delayed 20 year old, who loves animals. When Todd hears that the local animal shelter wants to adopt dogs out for Christmas, Todd is right on board, much to the dismay of his father George. With persistence Todd is eventually given permission to bring home a yellow lab he names Christmas. Little does the family know that Christmas will change their life forever. Check out the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:35     Year: 2009     2. Beethoven's Christmas Adventure  Photo Credit: IMBdOur favorite Saint Bernard is back in Beethoven's Christmas Adventure. When Santa's sleigh crashes in a small town and the magic toy bag is stolen, it's up to Beethoven to find the bag and return it to Santa in time for Christmas. Sure to be a family favorite. Watch the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:30     Year: 2011   3. The 12 Dogs of Christmas   The 12 Dogs of Christmas takes place in 1931 in Maine during the Depression and tells the story of a young girl named Emma who uses 12 special dogs to show everyone the true meaning of Christmas. Watch the trailer here. Rating: G     Length: 1:42     Year: 2005     4. 12 Dogs of Christmas: Great Puppy Rescue   The 12 Dogs of Christmas was followed by a sequel titled 12 Dogs of Christmas: Great Puppy Rescue. Emma is back again, but this time follows her quest to save a local puppy orphanage, by putting on a big holiday event.  Watch the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:42     Year: 2012       5. Buddies Movies   As a follow up to the classic Air Bud movies, Disney released three different buddies movies that the kids will love! The titles are: Santa Buddies (2009), The Search for Santa Paws (2010) and Santa Paws 2 (2012). Click on each of the titles to watch the trailer for each of these movies. Rating: G     Length: Varies     Year: 2010   6. The Dog Who Saved Christmas   When the Bannister's welcome a new dog named Zeus into their home, he doesn't appear to be the guard dog that the family is looking for. But when two burglars break into their house when they are away for the holidays, Zeus sets out to

A dog with a weak immune system can be prone to many diseases such as diabetes, osteoarthritis, infections and cancer. It is important to maintain your dog’s immune system as it is the first line of defense against viruses, bacteria, parasites and other unwanted toxins. A balanced immune system will improve your dog’s overall health and well-being. Here are some ways you can boost your dog’s immunity. Balanced Diet A balanced diet is the most important element of building immunity since the gastrointestinal system makes up 70% of a dog’s immune system. A moist, meat-based diet is usually recommended for dogs. Dry foods might contain a lot of starch which can lead to inflammation. A starch-free, grain-free diet containing a good amount of fiber and liver bacteria from fresh foods works best. Fresh meats and vegetables can also be added to your dog’s daily intake. Keep in mind that each dog’s nutritional needs are different, so be sure to consult your veterinarian to ensure that your pet is receiving immune-boosting meals. Exercise Dogs are active creatures that require physical activity to stay healthy. The need to keep them active will also make you more active which is a win-win situation. Lack of exercise can lead to your pet gaining weight, which is an invitation to a host of different health problems. Since dogs inherently love to play, exercise will not be a chore with them. You can also try to teach your dog new activities such as retrieving, doing scent work or simply learning new tricks. Hydration Ensure that your pet has access to clean and fresh water. It is as essential as a nutrition filled diet. Water encourages digestion, promotes healthy blood flow, regulates body temperature and flushes out toxins and harmful substances from a dog’s body, which ultimately boosts their immunity. Generally, dogs require around twelve ounces of water per ten pounds of body weight every day. The number can vary based on the age, weather, activity level and breed. Supplements You can consider adding nutritional supplements to your dog’s diet. Canine foods bought at the store might not always have the necessary vitamins and minerals for your dog’s daily needs. Additional supplements can fill those requirements. According to The Bircher Bar Australia, many all-natural supplements are available nowadays and you can easily find them online. Make sure you don’t overdo the supplements and consult your vet about the supplements that will work best for your

Federal law stipulates that a Service Animal is "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability" and that a Service Dog teams are allowed to enter areas where the public is normally allowed to go. However, a Service Dog team's civil rights may be occasionally challenged by well-meaning people trying to keep pets out of the establishment. While stressful, these challenges are typically easy to handle. Sometimes, though, a little more work is required.