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Working Dog Tag

  /  Posts tagged "Working Dog"

Whether you're looking for a new apartment new home with your service dog or pet, this article will walk you through the steps to finding the perfect pet-friendly apartment. It covers things like ensuring your new home is on a quiet residential street, breed restrictions, and what to look out for. In addition, it will give you tips for checking out your neighbors' pets and negotiating a lease with the landlord.   Make sure the environment is safe When you move to a new place with pets, it is important to check the breed restrictions to see if you can bring your pet with you. Some San Jose pet friendly apartments communities do not allow certain dog breeds and will exercise restraint if the animal is too aggressive. It is also important to know about the age of the dog to make sure the new environment is safe for your furry friend. Here are some common breed restrictions: Before you get your new place, you need to research the new state laws to find out if there are any dog vaccination or licensing requirements.   Honesty with landlords One way to avoid problems in renting a new home with your service dog or pet is, to be honest with your landlord. Not only is it advisable to be upfront about the nature of your pet, but it will also make your landlord more comfortable with your decision. When discussing a pet deposit, be sure to fully understand its terms and conditions. By being honest with your landlord, you can avoid any unpleasant surprises during your stay and also save money in the long run. Showing your landlord a vet's letter confirming that your pet is well-trained will show your landlord that you've taken good care of it. Unless you have a service dog, you should also ask about pet deposits and pet rent. Pets can cause damage to your property so it's advisable to protect your property by purchasing insurance that covers these costs.   Service dogs are not pets Under the law, Service Dogs are considered medical equipment and therefore are exempt from no-pet housing and breed restrictions, however being considerate will go a long way in making your new home experience more pleasant. It's not unusual for a landlord or HOA to request a letter from a prospective tenant's physician stating their need for a Service Dog, however physicians can't verify training or testify to the behavior of the

Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs aren’t the only dogs in the world who do amazing, life-changing work, but they are one of the few types of working dogs clearly defined and protected by United States federal law. Too many people don’t understand the differences between many types of working dogs, though, and it’s time to clear up some of the confusion.

It's that time of year again: Christmas is over! You may be looking for new ways to spoil your dog in the new year and there are many things to do to make them feel special, now that you have some more time to spend focusing on them. It's important not to forget your furry friend during the mew year! In this blog post, we'll be discussing five great ideas on how you can ensure your pup doesn't feel left out.   Ways of Keeping Your Dog Happy in the New Year 1. Ensure Your Dog is Well-Groomed One of the best ways to ensure your dog doesn't get left out is by grooming them. There's nothing worse than a pet that looks unkempt during one of the most festive times of the year, so you must keep up with their grooming routine. This includes: Brushing their teeth Trimming their nails Keeping them clean overall An excellent way to ensure your dog always looks its best is using quality pet shampoo. Not only will this keep your pup clean, but it will also leave them smelling wonderful.   2. Prepare Some Treats The best types of treats you can get for your pup are ones that promote healthy eating habits. These include natural dog chews, which support a healthy lifestyle and taste delicious. Your dog will love getting treats like these during the new year, and you'll love knowing that they're good for them!   3. Get Them a New Toy Why not get your dog one of the new toys that were released for Christmas last year that now have a discounted price in the January sales? There are many types of toys available for you. It can be hard to know which one is right for your pup. One of the best toys you can get your dog during this time is a plush toy. These types of toys are great because they're soft and cuddly, making them perfect for snuggling with on those cold nights.   4. Get Them a New Bed Your dog deserves the best, and that includes their fancy new bed. You can find some great products on eBay or Amazon that your pup will love. Another type of bed you might want to consider getting your dog is a memory foam bed. They are comfortable and reduce pressure points and relieve pain in your pup's joints.   5. Take Them for a Walk One of the best things you can do to keep

Brace and Mobility Support Dogs are a type of Service Dog trained to provide their disabled handler with assistance moving from place to place. This invaluable service is matched only by these dogs’ ability to also help with other chores and tasks, like opening doors or retrieving dropped items. Due to the unique nature of their work, though, Brace and Mobility Support Dogs have special needs. Read on to learn more!

In early 2021, the Department of Transportation (DOT) updated Service Dog travel rules for Service Dog travel by air. In a nutshell, the new DOT Service Dog rules ban Emotional Support Animals on planes and require all Service Dog handlers to fill out two forms at least 48 hours prior to traveling. One of the new DOT Service Animal forms concerns training and behavior and the other health and wellness. For dogs joining their partner on flights longer than 8 hours, an elimination habits form will also be required. The new updates also change the definition of "Service Animal," for the purposes of flying, to include only dogs. No other species of animal, including miniature horses, will be recognized. Ideally, the new DOT rules will ensure dogs traveling in the passenger compartment of the plane are well-behaved and trained for public access. While there's a little more work required on the part of Service Dog handlers prior to flying, overall, the new process is more streamlined. All airlines will utilize the standardized DOT forms. Owner-trained teams, teams which trained under an individual trainer or organization are all treated the same Owner-trainers (people who have trained their own dog), those who have worked with a private trainer or organization-trained dogs will utilize the same form. The forms do require the name of a trainer, however if you've trained your dog yourself or if you no longer have contact with the trainer who originally worked with you (which is extremely common) you may use your own name or that of another trainer as long as you and your animal can meet Service Dog Standards. Some airlines, like American Airlines, allow electronic submission of the forms, whereas others require the forms to be emailed or brought to the desk. Copies of the 2021 Service Dog travel forms can be downloaded here. The new updates also address and standardize a few other common Service Dog travel concerns. Per the DOT, the 2021 Service Animal Final Rule: Defines a service animal as a dog that is individually trained by an owner-trainer, individual trainer or training organization to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of a person with a disability; No longer considers an emotional support animal to be a service animal; Requires airlines to treat psychiatric service animals the same as other service animals; Allows airlines to require forms developed by DOT attesting to a service animal’s

When it comes to Emotional Support Animals, misconceptions and myths abound. People often believe Service Dogs and ESAs are the same things, with similar access rights. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Emotional Support Animals aren't Service Dogs, they don't have public access, and they don't require specialized training. Keep reading and dig into the nitty-gritty facts about ESAs. Emotional Support Animals Aren't Service Dogs Emotional Support Animals, including Emotional Support Dogs, are not Service Dogs. Let's say it again for the people in the back -- ESAs differ from Service Dogs. While ESAs add value to their handler's lives, legally, they have the same rights as pets, unlike Service Dogs. Service Dogs receive accommodation under America's disability access laws, whereas ESAs do not. To learn more about the difference between therapy dogs, Service Dogs, ESAs, and other working dogs, check out this article.   Emotional Support Animals Are Pets Legally, ESAs are pets. They're allowed in no-pets-housing and on air transportation with the proper documentation, but outside of that, ESAs are simply pets. Someone gets an ESA when their doctor, psychiatrist, or therapist says animal companionship would benefit them and writes a letter documenting that fact. Most ESAs were simply family pets before their handler obtained a letter of necessity from a medical caregiver.   Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are an important type of working dog Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are an important type of working dog, but they are not Service Dogs. There is no legal or valid certification or training requirements for Emotional Support Animals. We don't allow Emotional Support Animals to be included as part of Service Dog Standards or the The United States Service Dog Registry because they are not Service Dogs and therefore not covered under the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA). A simple letter from a physician or counselor stating need (but not mentioning any specifics) is the only documentation that is recognized under law. Emotional Support Animals Don't Require Specialized Training ESAs help individuals by comforting them with their presence but are not required to perform work or tasks related to a disability. ESAs have their own rights, separate from Service Dogs. Emotional Support Animals Don't Have Public Access Contrary to popular belief and pop culture, Emotional Support Animals don't possess public access rights. They do not belong in grocery stores, restaurants, or in places of public accommodation. This includes hospitals, doctors offices, pharmacies, and other medical environments. Of course, handlers of Emotional

If you partnered with a service dog, one of your concerns likely involves what would happen should you encounter an off-leash or out-of-control dog. Most of the time the other dogs you encounter are generally well-behaved. However, there's always a risk that another dog could distract your canine partner from doing their job — or worse. But what happens if a dog bites you or your dog? Here are seven things you need to know about dog bites.   1. All dogs need to be socialized Of course, an extremely important key to reducing incidents is training, specifically exhaustive socialization with your dog. The more situations your dog is exposed to the better and safer they will perform. That being said, accidents do happen.   2. Evaluate the dog bite and the seriousness of the incident Fortunately, most dog are not serious. However, if blood is drawn it's important to get appropriate medical attention quickly in order to avoid infection which lead to complications later. If a dog bites you, take these steps right away: Wash the wound. Use mild soap, and run warm tap water over it for five to 10 minutes. Slow the bleeding with a clean cloth. Apply over-the counter antibiotic cream if you have it. Wrap the wound in a sterile bandage. Keep the wound bandaged and see your doctor. Change the bandage several times a day once your doctor has examined the wound. Watch for signs of infection, including redness, swelling, increased pain and fever. Depending on the situation, you may also want to collect the information from owner of the dog who bit and witness information if applicable. Don’t forget to collect the dog owner’s insurance details too. Photos of any injuries and other documentation may prove helpful in the future.   3. You may be entitled to dog bite compensation Depending on the severity of the incident, you may be entitled to compensation for medical bills, lost wages due to the injuries sustained, and the pain and suffering you underwent. Hire a dog bite lawyer in Oklahoma City or a city near you to help with your compensation case.   4. Understand about liability Every dog owner is strictly liable for any bites if they knew or ought to have known of the dog's vicious or dangerous nature as experienced in past occurrences. The burden of proof lies with the victim as it's their responsibility to prove that the dog owner knew or should have known of the dog's

Rules exist for a reason and when it comes to service dogs and service dog law, some have come to view them more as "guidelines." Whether it's someone who wishes they could take their dog everywhere or those who deny access to properly trained service dog teams, both groups harm the service dog and disabled community as a whole. Most people love their dogs, and usually, when someone tells a service dog team they meet in public that they'd like to know how to make their dog a service dog, their likely intent isn't malicious or meant to be hurtful.  Nonetheless, it's a poorly thought-out aspiration. It's similar to saying, "no offense," before insulting someone. This issue is far more complex than it seems on the surface, especially when it comes to able-bodied people who actually carry out their wishes by faking service dog status with their pets. Read on to learn more about what you're insinuating by wishing for a Service Dog if you're not disabled, how masquerading pets as Service Dogs is not only extremely disrespectful, but also harmful, and some important points to consider about service dog partnership and the service dog community.   Service Dog Handlers Are, By Definition, Disabled First, per U.S. federal law and the ADA, Service dog handlers must be disabled. Service Dogs perform tasks that their disabled owners would otherwise have difficulty completing on their own. If you do not have a disability, then you do not qualify for a service dog. Period. End of story. Full stop. There are no exceptions. By expressing a desire for a service dog, you're also wishing for the accompanying disability. For a disabled person, hearing an able-bodied person openly wish for a disability (even if you don't actually say those words) is deeply hurtful. It suggests you don't take them or their disability seriously and furthermore, it makes light of the thousands of hours of training and socialization their partner has undergone to perform his job. From time to time, when disabled service dog handlers or service dog trainers are out in public, they're approached by someone with a wistful look and a story about how their dog would be "just perfect!" for service dog work. They wish they could take their dog everywhere, too, but there's one problem: they don't understand that the right to be accompanied by a fully-trained service dog comes with a cascading pile of problems

Taking care of your pet is a big enough challenge for you to deal with. so finding a pet insurance plan that takes care of your pet shouldn’t be. But yet for many pet owners, it seems like finding the right pet insurance turns into a stressful and overwhelming process—likely because there is simply so much information to sift through. To help you spend less time stressing and more time snuggling with your furry friend, we want to help guide you towards finding the right pet insurance for you. It is important to weigh up the pros and cons of the plan you are signing up for, because you want to ensure that your due diligence will mean your pet will get the absolute premium care no matter what happens. Pumpkin pet insurance is leading the way when it comes to providing the ultimate pet insurance for pet owners and is the perfect example of what to look for when signing up for a policy of your own.   Here is the ultimate guide to choosing the right pet insurance for you and your pet.   Step 1: Understand Your Pet Before you even start searching for the right pet insurance for your pet, you need to first understand your pet and its needs. Not all pet insurance plans are the same, so you need to know any specific requirements for care that the plan needs to provide upfront. Make sure you know what your pet’s breed is, their age, any pre-existing conditions or hereditary issues to be on the lookout for. When you know this, it will be much easier to select the pet insurance that is right for them, allowing you to be confident you are getting your money’s worth.   Step 2: Compare Premium Costs As with health insurance for humans, the details of what your premium plan for your pet covers will likely vary based on how much you are paying. So compare what your costs are versus the annual deductibles you need to be prepared to still pay out of pocket, how much you will get reimbursed for various costs and the added benefits of your coverage plans. The best pet insurance plans will reimburse 90% of veterinarian bills if the service provided is covered in the plan, as the whole point of pet insurance is to avoid any costly bills that will put you out of pocket.   Step 3: Evaluate the Customer Service While the main

Service dogs are not just pets; they are loyal friends who become family to their owners. They come in handy for persons with any disability besides visual and hearing disabilities. The death of such a dog can be devastating. Since there are no prescribed ways for mourning and honoring deceased pets, you do what you can to celebrate your pet's memory. Below are ways to honor a dead service dog. Consider a pet cremation service Cremating your service dog is a great way to honor its memory. You may choose to hold a private cremation service together with others who interacted with the dog. Arrange for people to give tributes. This gives you comfort and peace of mind. After the service, your pet is cremated then their ashes are handed to you to bury or scatter. The pet cremation cost depends on the size of your pet. Hold a memorial service Since service dogs become a part of your family, holding a memorial service in their remembrance can be a great way to honor them and also help with the grieving process. You can invite family and friends to share your dog's memories and the experiences you had with them. Consider holding the service in an outdoor setting or your home. Plant a tree Whether you cremate or bury your service dog, consider planting a tree or a flower bed in their memory. This will help keep the dog's memory alive each time you look at the tree. Personalize an accessory in their memory A necklace, ring, or bracelet made with your dog's image, name, paw, or face is a great way to honor them because each time you wear them, you're reminded of them. You can also have jewelry made from their teeth. Getting a tooth set pendant crafted is another way to keep your pet's memory alive. You can also have pet memorial jewelry made using some of your dog's ashes. In addition, you can have a cup or a plate hand-made and printed with your dog's face. Donate in your dog's name Consider donating money, time, food, or anything that other dogs in a dog charity organization need. You may donate based on your dog’s species, appearance, or age. For example, if your service dog was elderly, donate to an organization that cares for senior dogs to better their lives. In addition, you may donate to the same organization you got your service dog from or towards