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January 2022

  /    /  January

It's that time of year again: Christmas is over! You may be looking for new ways to spoil your dog in the new year and there are many things to do to make them feel special, now that you have some more time to spend focusing on them. It's important not to forget your furry friend during the mew year! In this blog post, we'll be discussing five great ideas on how you can ensure your pup doesn't feel left out.   Ways of Keeping Your Dog Happy in the New Year 1. Ensure Your Dog is Well-Groomed One of the best ways to ensure your dog doesn't get left out is by grooming them. There's nothing worse than a pet that looks unkempt during one of the most festive times of the year, so you must keep up with their grooming routine. This includes: Brushing their teeth Trimming their nails Keeping them clean overall An excellent way to ensure your dog always looks its best is using quality pet shampoo. Not only will this keep your pup clean, but it will also leave them smelling wonderful.   2. Prepare Some Treats The best types of treats you can get for your pup are ones that promote healthy eating habits. These include natural dog chews, which support a healthy lifestyle and taste delicious. Your dog will love getting treats like these during the new year, and you'll love knowing that they're good for them!   3. Get Them a New Toy Why not get your dog one of the new toys that were released for Christmas last year that now have a discounted price in the January sales? There are many types of toys available for you. It can be hard to know which one is right for your pup. One of the best toys you can get your dog during this time is a plush toy. These types of toys are great because they're soft and cuddly, making them perfect for snuggling with on those cold nights.   4. Get Them a New Bed Your dog deserves the best, and that includes their fancy new bed. You can find some great products on eBay or Amazon that your pup will love. Another type of bed you might want to consider getting your dog is a memory foam bed. They are comfortable and reduce pressure points and relieve pain in your pup's joints.   5. Take Them for a Walk One of the best things you can do to keep

As a dog owner, you may find yourself facing many challenges. You have to feed your dog well and ensure it gets plenty of exercises, but did you know that there are other things you need to watch out for? One common problem for pedigree dogs is inbreeding. This can lead to health issues down the line. This blog post will discuss some of the potential problems with pedigree dogs and what owners can do about it!   Problems for Owners of Pedigree Dogs Inbreeding The most common issue with pedigree dogs is inbreeding. Inbreeding occurs when the same pair of animals breed together repeatedly over a short period. This can lead to undesirable changes within the gene pool of an animal population. These deviations are harmful and cause problems for the entire lineage, leading to health issues. Pedigree dogs are particularly susceptible to inbreeding because of the small gene pools used to create them. Hip Dysplasia Another common problem is hip dysplasia when the joints between the ball and socket get deformed or malformed. These dogs often suffer from severe arthritis later on in life, making movement difficult and painful. Although some breeds are more prone to hip dysplasia than others, all species can be victims. Eye Problems Many pedigree dogs are also prone to various eye problems. These can include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and glaucoma. All of these conditions can lead to blindness if left untreated. Skin Disorders Many pedigree dogs also suffer from skin disorders. This can be due to various reasons, such as allergies, environmental factors, and genetics. Some common skin disorders include dermatitis, seborrhea, and mange. Heart Problems The trouble with the heart is also common among pedigree dogs. These problems may include congenital defects, infectious cardiomyopathy, and various heart conditions. The most common heart problem in dogs is subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS), which reduces the blood flow to the heart. SAS can lead to sudden death if left untreated. Cancer Cancer is also common among pedigree dogs. One type of cancer that has become more prevalent in recent years is hemangiosarcoma, which affects the blood vessels within an organ or tissue and often leads to internal bleeding and tumor development. Other forms of cancer that are particularly prevalent in pedigree dogs include lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and mammary carcinoma.   How Can I Help My Pedigree Dog? There are a few things you can do to help your pedigree dog stay healthy. Consider enrolling your dog in a

Hearing Dogs alert their hard of hearing or deaf handlers to important sounds in the environment. Commonly trained sounds include approaching cars, fire alarms, sirens, dropped keys, and the handler's name. Read on to learn all about Hearing Dogs, where they come from, what they do, and how they're trained! Bonus: Read our step-by-step training guide at the end of this post to learn how to introduce new sounds to a Hearing Dog in Training.    Hearing Dog Basics Hearing Dogs, also known as Hearing Alert Dogs, Hearing Ear Dogs, or Signal Dogs, partner with D/deaf and hard of hearing people of all ages. These specialized Service Dogs undergo countless hours of task training, during which they learn to recognize a variety of sounds and how to notify their handler of the sound. Before being accepted for Hearing Dog training, trainers test the canine candidate for sound temperament, good physical structure, and a keen, curious, social personality. Upon passing their initial temperament and aptitude evaluation, new Hearing Dogs in Training formally begin their Service Dog foundation training. They learn manners, basic and advanced obedience, and public access skills. They work on focusing through distractions and on building impulse control. After these special dogs master the basics, they begin their advanced training. For Hearing Dogs, this consists of "soundwork," or the process of learning sounds and the associated alert behaviors. Some Hearing Dogs work for people with multiple disabilities. These multi-purpose Service Dogs may be cross-trained for other Service Dog jobs and undergo additional task training. Good Hearing Dogs undergo hundreds of hours of specialized training and socialization before ever entering the field. Once teams graduate from training, they continue building their skills and bonding as a pair.   Who Trains Hearing Dogs? In the United States, Hearing Dogs can be trained by a professional organization or program, or their future handler can train them. If the handler self-trains their own Service Dog, it's called "owner training." U.S. Federal law protects the public access rights of professionally trained Service Dogs and owner trained Service Dogs the same way -- there are no differences. Both types of Service Dogs enjoy the same level of protection. Several organizations in the United States train and place Hearing Dogs. Each has their own set of requirements and guidelines for receiving a Hearing Dog. These are a few of the most well-known programs: International Hearing Dog, Inc. - They've trained over 1,300 Hearing Dogs and have been in

New Years is a time for reflection and resolutions Most people think about the usual things: losing weight, learning to live in the moment, etc. but our mission is to encourage disabled individuals who use Service Dogs to leave nothing but an excellent impression. Here are 10 ways to be a better Service Dog team in the coming year. 1) Be polite and make an effort to educate others if you can If you've been partnered with a Service Dog long enough, chances are excellent that you will have run into an access challenge, someone who is rude, secretly (or openly) jealous that you have your dog with you — or just behaves awkwardly toward you or your canine partner. Perhaps they'll ask invasive questions. If you have an invisible disability, they may wonder aloud why "you don't look disabled" or even openly confront you. Chances are they have never met a Service Dog team before. It's possible that they have an image in their mind of what a disabled person with a Service Dog should look like. While having a Service Dog does not also require you to take on the role of Public Educator (and nor does everyone have time, especially when you're tired of being confronted the third time in one day) it's important to leave an excellent impression. Remember, it takes only moment to leave an excellent impression — or to do the opposite. Always remember that you only get one shot at making a first impression. Be aware that your impression upon others, again likely being their first and only interaction with a team, can directly affect your rights later. The impression you leave with the public can directly impact your rights as a team, as well as the treatment you and other Service Dog teams receive in the future from both people on the street and businesses alike. Going further, the impression you leave can directly or indirectly affect change on the laws that govern you in your state or even at a federal level. Be kind, be courteous, and treat others as you want to be treated. You may be in a rush, but the decision to partner with a Service Dog comes with responsibilities, so you should always strive to be a better Service Dog team than you were yesterday, last month or last year. You just want to get out of the store, but taking one