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People have been made aware of the increased risk that their furry canine friend would be prone to tick-borne diseases in the past years. Most of us are probably aware that ticks numerous diseased is connected to fleas and ticks; nevertheless, you might not be aware that this pest number continues to grow in our surroundings has increased. Consequently, your pets will probably become infected by a flea or tick. Various variables have something to do with the dramatic surge in tick reproduction. Ticks are very active in summer. Therefore, tick-related sickness is primarily distributed during hot seasons. Ticks, however, have been shown to breed year-round in several regions because of warmer temperatures. Furthermore, the continuous growth of our population and the creation of new homes in forested locations increased the potential of tick infestation in our pets. In addition, more people are taking their pets outside in high-trafficked areas, increasing their exposure to parasites. Ticks and fleas can transmit various potentially fatal infections like ehrlichiosis, rocky mountain disease, and much more. Furthermore, Minor complications can happen if not treated promptly and properly, so watch your dog carefully. If you see that your dog is not behaving normally, you need to bring them to the nearest vet so that they can address the condition of your dog. Ticks can infect dogs with serious and sometimes fatal diseases. Continue reading to learn everything about ticks on dogs as well as keeping them safe.   What is a Tick? Ticks are a common parasite that feeds on their hosts' blood and can transmit numerous diseases in dogs. Ticks multiply by attaching themselves to the host and then mate to multiply, and larvae emerge from the eggs, at which point they begin looking for your dog. Once this tiny critter attaches to your dog, inserting its mouth parts into your pet's skin, it will begin to feed on your pet's blood flow. Once hooked to your pet's skin, ticks will not leave until they are satisfied, which can take many days. Ticks frequently go for regions with crevasses. This typically comprises ear crevices, inside the legs, in between legs and toes. Ticks are a common pest in lots of places, and eliminating them would be impossible; preventing them from getting in our area is as close to the possible task.   Common Types of Ticks in Dogs Below are the most common ticks in dogs. These ticks are the most common

People often believe Service Dogs and ESAs are the same things, with similar access rights. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Emotional Support Animals aren't Service Dogs, they don't have public access, and they don't require specialized training. Keep reading and dig into the nitty-gritty facts about ESAs.   Emotional Support Dogs Don't Have Public Access Contrary to popular belief and pop culture, Emotional Support Animals don't possess public access rights. They do not belong in grocery stores, restaurants, or in places of public accommodation. This includes hospitals, doctors offices, pharmacies, and other medical environments. Nothing grants ESAs public access rights, not even a vest or an ID card, because, under U.S. federal law, ESAs do not have public access rights. Period. End of story. ESAs may accompany their handlers only in places where pets are allowed, with a couple of notable exceptions.   ESAs Have Access to Housing Both Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals are permitted to live with their handlers under federal housing law. It’s not unusual for a landlord to require a physician letter or other form of documentation from those who use Service Dogs. ESA status does not exempt someone for being responsible for any damages caused by their ESA.   ESAs Don't Require Specialized Training Unlike Service Dogs, Emotional Support Animals don't require specialized training however they must be capable of working safely, which means no timidity, no fear, no aggression, no out of control behavior, and no excessive vocalizing.   Emotional Support Animals Aren't Service Dogs Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are an important type of working dog, but they are not Service Dogs. Let's say it again for the people in the back -- ESAs differ from Service Dogs. While ESAs add value to their handler's lives, legally, they have the same rights as pets, unlike Service Dogs. Service Dogs receive accommodation under America's disability access laws, whereas ESAs do not. To learn more about the difference between therapy dogs, Service Dogs, ESAs, and other working dogs, check out this article.   Emotional Support Animals Are Pets Legally, ESAs are pets. They're allowed in no-pets-housing but outside of that, ESAs are simply pets. Someone gets an ESA when their doctor, psychiatrist, or therapist says animal companionship would benefit them and writes a letter documenting that fact. Most ESAs were simply family pets before their handler obtained a letter of necessity from a medical caregiver.         .                  

It can be difficult to take care of a pet with a terminal illness — and that difficulty is compounded if you are disabled and have a Service Dog. What are some things you should keep in mind if you have a terminally ill pet?   Terminal illness is heartbreaking for you as a pet owner. Illness and its symptoms can vary, and for some pets, a terminal disease may be something they live with for many months or years. Particularly if the illness is degenerative, it can make life very difficult for both you and your pet. How can you, as the pet owner, help your pet as much as possible? Here are a few things you can do to make life a little easier for your terminally ill pet.   Always Stay Up to Date With All Medications and Other Regimens One of the most important and caring things you can do is to stay up to date with your pet’s medications and any other regimens your veterinarian has prescribed. These are the things that will keep your pet feeling more comfortable in the last chapter of their life. If your veterinarian has prescribed something specific for your pet, make sure you stay up to date with it. Also, if you notice any changes in your pet’s health or behavior you should check with your vet.   Avoid Stressing Your Pet Out Unduly Stress can have serious negative health impacts for both humans and pets, and if your pet has a terminal condition, you need to be as careful as possible to avoid stressing your pet out and putting extra difficulties on your pet’s health. Stressing your pet out is something you want to avoid if at all possible. This may mean reducing stressors in your home in general, like giving your pet a quiet space in the house that’s just for them, like a special bed or area.   Look into Diet and Exercise Options You may need to consider special diet and exercise options for your pet. Feeding schedules may need to be adjusted to accommodate medication requirements. Your pet may benefit from some exercise or stimulation to encourage movement. Talk to your veterinarian about what you can do to best manage your pet’s diet and food requirements, and also ask what kinds of exercise might be best for your pet.   Keep Track of All Symptoms and Concerns It’s important that you’re always keeping track of the symptoms that

Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs aren’t the only dogs in the world who do amazing, life-changing work, but they are one of the few types of working dogs clearly defined and protected by United States federal law. Too many people don’t understand the differences between many types of working dogs, though, and it’s time to clear up some of the confusion.

It's that time of year again: Christmas is over! You may be looking for new ways to spoil your dog in the new year and there are many things to do to make them feel special, now that you have some more time to spend focusing on them. It's important not to forget your furry friend during the mew year! In this blog post, we'll be discussing five great ideas on how you can ensure your pup doesn't feel left out.   Ways of Keeping Your Dog Happy in the New Year 1. Ensure Your Dog is Well-Groomed One of the best ways to ensure your dog doesn't get left out is by grooming them. There's nothing worse than a pet that looks unkempt during one of the most festive times of the year, so you must keep up with their grooming routine. This includes: Brushing their teeth Trimming their nails Keeping them clean overall An excellent way to ensure your dog always looks its best is using quality pet shampoo. Not only will this keep your pup clean, but it will also leave them smelling wonderful.   2. Prepare Some Treats The best types of treats you can get for your pup are ones that promote healthy eating habits. These include natural dog chews, which support a healthy lifestyle and taste delicious. Your dog will love getting treats like these during the new year, and you'll love knowing that they're good for them!   3. Get Them a New Toy Why not get your dog one of the new toys that were released for Christmas last year that now have a discounted price in the January sales? There are many types of toys available for you. It can be hard to know which one is right for your pup. One of the best toys you can get your dog during this time is a plush toy. These types of toys are great because they're soft and cuddly, making them perfect for snuggling with on those cold nights.   4. Get Them a New Bed Your dog deserves the best, and that includes their fancy new bed. You can find some great products on eBay or Amazon that your pup will love. Another type of bed you might want to consider getting your dog is a memory foam bed. They are comfortable and reduce pressure points and relieve pain in your pup's joints.   5. Take Them for a Walk One of the best things you can do to keep

As a dog owner, you may find yourself facing many challenges. You have to feed your dog well and ensure it gets plenty of exercises, but did you know that there are other things you need to watch out for? One common problem for pedigree dogs is inbreeding. This can lead to health issues down the line. This blog post will discuss some of the potential problems with pedigree dogs and what owners can do about it!   Problems for Owners of Pedigree Dogs Inbreeding The most common issue with pedigree dogs is inbreeding. Inbreeding occurs when the same pair of animals breed together repeatedly over a short period. This can lead to undesirable changes within the gene pool of an animal population. These deviations are harmful and cause problems for the entire lineage, leading to health issues. Pedigree dogs are particularly susceptible to inbreeding because of the small gene pools used to create them. Hip Dysplasia Another common problem is hip dysplasia when the joints between the ball and socket get deformed or malformed. These dogs often suffer from severe arthritis later on in life, making movement difficult and painful. Although some breeds are more prone to hip dysplasia than others, all species can be victims. Eye Problems Many pedigree dogs are also prone to various eye problems. These can include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and glaucoma. All of these conditions can lead to blindness if left untreated. Skin Disorders Many pedigree dogs also suffer from skin disorders. This can be due to various reasons, such as allergies, environmental factors, and genetics. Some common skin disorders include dermatitis, seborrhea, and mange. Heart Problems The trouble with the heart is also common among pedigree dogs. These problems may include congenital defects, infectious cardiomyopathy, and various heart conditions. The most common heart problem in dogs is subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS), which reduces the blood flow to the heart. SAS can lead to sudden death if left untreated. Cancer Cancer is also common among pedigree dogs. One type of cancer that has become more prevalent in recent years is hemangiosarcoma, which affects the blood vessels within an organ or tissue and often leads to internal bleeding and tumor development. Other forms of cancer that are particularly prevalent in pedigree dogs include lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and mammary carcinoma.   How Can I Help My Pedigree Dog? There are a few things you can do to help your pedigree dog stay healthy. Consider enrolling your dog in a

When it comes to Service Dogs or Service Dogs in Training with public access, there are definite things Service Dogs in public should and should not do. Learn more about how well-trained Service Dogs should appear and what U.S. Service Dog law says about dogs who don't quite possess the skills necessary to safely work in public

What is PTSD? Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD is most often associated with soldiers, however they're only a small segment of the population who suffer from it. PTSD is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event or series of events — either by experiencing them or witnessing them. In popular culture, PTSD is brought on a single event however for most people it's multiple events or even a pattern of events that feels inescapable. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about what happened. Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulty adjusting and coping, but with time and good self-care, they usually get better. If the symptoms get worse, last for months or even years, and interfere with your day-to-day functioning, you may have PTSD.   Memories or flashbacks trigger PTSD Another mundane day in the office; stocking patient rooms, prepping a few IV lines because our intel is that we had 75/25 chance of getting rocketed tonight, sweeping the Iraqi dust out of our makeshift aid station, when suddenly my  heart starts pounding, tears spring to my eyes and I feel out of control. I had been having difficulty sleeping, plagued with nightmares but just chalked it up to being homesick and missing my son.  This is different…I can’t function and it’s affecting my ability to do my job.  Something was wrong.  I tried to Skype with my parents about it and they just chalked it up to combat stress and told me to “suck it up.” I continued to experience these anxiety attacks that appeared unprovoked.  It progressed to flashbacks.  A certain smell would send me over the edge.  Or a touch… That night in April 2010, when everything began spiraling downhill, something inside of me snapped.  I couldn’t sit with my back to the door when I went to the DFAC (cafeteria) because I had to see the escape route and watch those that were coming or going.       .   PTSD makes you feel alone even when people are there to help Hello, my name is Shawna and I have PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).  Turned out that all those years of repressing the emotional baggage for all those “life altering events” finally came back to bite me in the butt and emerged as PTSD.  I worked with my psychologist for about six months when she asked me if I had thought about a

Taking care of your pet is a big enough challenge for you to deal with. so finding a pet insurance plan that takes care of your pet shouldn’t be. But yet for many pet owners, it seems like finding the right pet insurance turns into a stressful and overwhelming process—likely because there is simply so much information to sift through. To help you spend less time stressing and more time snuggling with your furry friend, we want to help guide you towards finding the right pet insurance for you. It is important to weigh up the pros and cons of the plan you are signing up for, because you want to ensure that your due diligence will mean your pet will get the absolute premium care no matter what happens. Pumpkin pet insurance is leading the way when it comes to providing the ultimate pet insurance for pet owners and is the perfect example of what to look for when signing up for a policy of your own.   Here is the ultimate guide to choosing the right pet insurance for you and your pet.   Step 1: Understand Your Pet Before you even start searching for the right pet insurance for your pet, you need to first understand your pet and its needs. Not all pet insurance plans are the same, so you need to know any specific requirements for care that the plan needs to provide upfront. Make sure you know what your pet’s breed is, their age, any pre-existing conditions or hereditary issues to be on the lookout for. When you know this, it will be much easier to select the pet insurance that is right for them, allowing you to be confident you are getting your money’s worth.   Step 2: Compare Premium Costs As with health insurance for humans, the details of what your premium plan for your pet covers will likely vary based on how much you are paying. So compare what your costs are versus the annual deductibles you need to be prepared to still pay out of pocket, how much you will get reimbursed for various costs and the added benefits of your coverage plans. The best pet insurance plans will reimburse 90% of veterinarian bills if the service provided is covered in the plan, as the whole point of pet insurance is to avoid any costly bills that will put you out of pocket.   Step 3: Evaluate the Customer Service While the main

An estimated 300 dogs assisted in search and rescue efforts after the attacks, that’s according to the 9/11 Memorial & Museum and the American Kennel Club. Many of the working dogs spent hours alongside handlers sniffing through rubble in hopes of finding survivors. Reports suggest most of the dogs only sustained minor injuries during their efforts: mainly cuts and scrapes to their paw pads. Here are 10 notable canines who helped others at the World Trade Center. MAIN PHOTO: Members of Pennsylvania Task Force One at Ground Zero: (from left) Chris Selfridge and Riley, Bobbie Snyder and Willow, Cindy Otto, Rose DeLuca and Logan, and John Gilkey and Bear. Roselle Roselle was sleeping under her owner, Michael Hingson’s, desk when a plane hit the first tower 15 floors above them. The three-year-old was Michael’s fifth guide dog, and helped her owner escape the building through smoke and crumbling debris via staircase B. She led her owner and 30 other people down 1,463 steps from the 78th floor out of the tower, which took over an hour. As they left the building, Tower 2 collapsed. Hingson later said: "While everyone ran in panic, Roselle remained totally focused on her job, while debris fell around us, and even hit us, Roselle stayed calm." The brave dog then led her owner to the safety of a subway station, where they helped a woman who had been blinded by falling debris. Salty Another guide dog, Salty, was on the 71st floor with his owner, Omar Rivera, when the hijacked plane hit the World Trade Center. Rivera recalled how they tried escaping down the nearest flight of stairs, but it was filled with smoke and became very hot and he thought it was too much for Salty, so let go of his harness so the dog could head down alone. Omar said he tried to let the dog go, but Salty refused and guided him to safety. Both Salty and Roselle were awarded a joint Dickin Medal, a British medal awarded to animals that have displayed "conspicuous gallantry or devotion to duty while serving or associated with any branch of the Armed Forces or Civil Defence Units". The award is commonly referred to as "the animals' Victoria Cross" Sirius Explosive detection dog Sirius was the only police dog to die in the 9/11 attack. The K9 employee was working with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department with