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service dog standards Tag

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When it comes to Service Dogs or Service Dogs in Training with public access, there are definite things Service Dogs in public should and should not do. Learn more about how well-trained Service Dogs should appear and what U.S. Service Dog law says about dogs who don't quite possess the skills necessary to safely work in public

What is PTSD? Post Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD is most often associated with soldiers, however they're only a small segment of the population who suffer from it. PTSD is a mental health condition that's triggered by a terrifying event or series of events — either by experiencing them or witnessing them. In popular culture, PTSD is brought on a single event however for most people it's multiple events or even a pattern of events that feels inescapable. Symptoms may include flashbacks, nightmares and severe anxiety, as well as uncontrollable thoughts about what happened. Most people who go through traumatic events may have temporary difficulty adjusting and coping, but with time and good self-care, they usually get better. If the symptoms get worse, last for months or even years, and interfere with your day-to-day functioning, you may have PTSD.   Memories or flashbacks trigger PTSD Another mundane day in the office; stocking patient rooms, prepping a few IV lines because our intel is that we had 75/25 chance of getting rocketed tonight, sweeping the Iraqi dust out of our makeshift aid station, when suddenly my  heart starts pounding, tears spring to my eyes and I feel out of control. I had been having difficulty sleeping, plagued with nightmares but just chalked it up to being homesick and missing my son.  This is different…I can’t function and it’s affecting my ability to do my job.  Something was wrong.  I tried to Skype with my parents about it and they just chalked it up to combat stress and told me to “suck it up.” I continued to experience these anxiety attacks that appeared unprovoked.  It progressed to flashbacks.  A certain smell would send me over the edge.  Or a touch… That night in April 2010, when everything began spiraling downhill, something inside of me snapped.  I couldn’t sit with my back to the door when I went to the DFAC (cafeteria) because I had to see the escape route and watch those that were coming or going.       .   PTSD makes you feel alone even when people are there to help Hello, my name is Shawna and I have PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).  Turned out that all those years of repressing the emotional baggage for all those “life altering events” finally came back to bite me in the butt and emerged as PTSD.  I worked with my psychologist for about six months when she asked me if I had thought about a

Taking care of your pet is a big enough challenge for you to deal with. so finding a pet insurance plan that takes care of your pet shouldn’t be. But yet for many pet owners, it seems like finding the right pet insurance turns into a stressful and overwhelming process—likely because there is simply so much information to sift through. To help you spend less time stressing and more time snuggling with your furry friend, we want to help guide you towards finding the right pet insurance for you. It is important to weigh up the pros and cons of the plan you are signing up for, because you want to ensure that your due diligence will mean your pet will get the absolute premium care no matter what happens. Pumpkin pet insurance is leading the way when it comes to providing the ultimate pet insurance for pet owners and is the perfect example of what to look for when signing up for a policy of your own.   Here is the ultimate guide to choosing the right pet insurance for you and your pet.   Step 1: Understand Your Pet Before you even start searching for the right pet insurance for your pet, you need to first understand your pet and its needs. Not all pet insurance plans are the same, so you need to know any specific requirements for care that the plan needs to provide upfront. Make sure you know what your pet’s breed is, their age, any pre-existing conditions or hereditary issues to be on the lookout for. When you know this, it will be much easier to select the pet insurance that is right for them, allowing you to be confident you are getting your money’s worth.   Step 2: Compare Premium Costs As with health insurance for humans, the details of what your premium plan for your pet covers will likely vary based on how much you are paying. So compare what your costs are versus the annual deductibles you need to be prepared to still pay out of pocket, how much you will get reimbursed for various costs and the added benefits of your coverage plans. The best pet insurance plans will reimburse 90% of veterinarian bills if the service provided is covered in the plan, as the whole point of pet insurance is to avoid any costly bills that will put you out of pocket.   Step 3: Evaluate the Customer Service While the main

An estimated 300 dogs assisted in search and rescue efforts after the attacks, that’s according to the 9/11 Memorial & Museum and the American Kennel Club. Many of the working dogs spent hours alongside handlers sniffing through rubble in hopes of finding survivors. Reports suggest most of the dogs only sustained minor injuries during their efforts: mainly cuts and scrapes to their paw pads. Here are 10 notable canines who helped others at the World Trade Center. MAIN PHOTO: Members of Pennsylvania Task Force One at Ground Zero: (from left) Chris Selfridge and Riley, Bobbie Snyder and Willow, Cindy Otto, Rose DeLuca and Logan, and John Gilkey and Bear. Roselle Roselle was sleeping under her owner, Michael Hingson’s, desk when a plane hit the first tower 15 floors above them. The three-year-old was Michael’s fifth guide dog, and helped her owner escape the building through smoke and crumbling debris via staircase B. She led her owner and 30 other people down 1,463 steps from the 78th floor out of the tower, which took over an hour. As they left the building, Tower 2 collapsed. Hingson later said: "While everyone ran in panic, Roselle remained totally focused on her job, while debris fell around us, and even hit us, Roselle stayed calm." The brave dog then led her owner to the safety of a subway station, where they helped a woman who had been blinded by falling debris. Salty Another guide dog, Salty, was on the 71st floor with his owner, Omar Rivera, when the hijacked plane hit the World Trade Center. Rivera recalled how they tried escaping down the nearest flight of stairs, but it was filled with smoke and became very hot and he thought it was too much for Salty, so let go of his harness so the dog could head down alone. Omar said he tried to let the dog go, but Salty refused and guided him to safety. Both Salty and Roselle were awarded a joint Dickin Medal, a British medal awarded to animals that have displayed "conspicuous gallantry or devotion to duty while serving or associated with any branch of the Armed Forces or Civil Defence Units". The award is commonly referred to as "the animals' Victoria Cross" Sirius Explosive detection dog Sirius was the only police dog to die in the 9/11 attack. The K9 employee was working with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department with

Dog Trainers have a tough job. Not only do they train animals — but they also have what is often a far more difficult task: training humans. And with Service Dogs, a trainer's job is even harder. Service Dog Standards helps trainers make sure that their clients understand not only their rights, but their responsibilities as well. How Service Dog Standards Works for Trainers If you're a trainer and you currently train Service Dogs or would like to begin, create an account on Service Dog Standards. Then, set up your free business or organization page. It's so robust, you can even use it in place of a website — no hosting fees or other costs of any kind. If you have a domain name, you can even forward it directly to your SDS profile page. From there, it's easy to invite clients to join. Example of a Service Dog Trainer profile page on Service Dog Standards Service Dog Standards features: · Free for trainers and handlers forever · Public profile page for service dog handlers with a secure resume · Business listings for dog trainers and breeders · Robust tools to manage service dog puppy candidates, graduates, washouts and more · Manage multiple service animals and their status · Secure training and ownership history · Clear explanation of expectations for service dog trainers and handlers · Service Dog Standards Public Access Test · Service Dog Standards Training and Behavior Standards · Template and guidance for getting a physician letter · Information to help the public better understand the complexities of Service Dogs In addition to these features, Service Dog Standards has a supportive online community of nearly 20,000 service animal trainers, handlers and their families, friends and fans. Check out their website at www.servicedogstandards.org. Based on over a decade of input from experienced service dog trainers and handlers, Service Dog Standards clearly lays out what is expected in terms of training, public behavior and more. Service Dog Standards aims to encourage adherence to the ADA and increase public trust through technology and education.      

Service Dog Standards (SDS) launches a suite of powerful new tools — specifically built for those who want to become partnered with a service dog and those who are currently service dog trainers or handlers — with the goal of making the process more straightforward, responsible and fun! Responsible service dog partnership. There are a lot of documents, tests and tools that responsible Service Dog trainers and handlers use as part of their training regimen. While absolutely none of these things on their own make a dog a Service Dog — and are strictly not required for Service Dog ownership under federal law — many handlers find them helpful as part of documenting their training. Service Dog Standards allows clients to share the fact that they have these documents in their possession without violating their privacy. Robust tools for handlers, trainers and training organizations At Service Dog Standards, trainers and training organizations can promote their businesses with free, robust, professional listings, manage, track and organize their human and canine clients and much more. Service dog handlers can create their own secure team Profile Page where they can safely share their training resume, complete with photos, training accomplishments and more. SDS also includes templates for physicians and walks people through the often complicated process of owning and training a service dog. See this example of a Service Dog Handler profile page on Service Dog Standards   Based on over a decade of input from experienced service dog trainers and handlers, Service Dog Standards clearly lays out what is expected in terms of training, public behavior and more. Service Dog Standards aims to encourage adherence to the ADA and increase public trust through technology and education. Example of a Service Dog Trainer profile page on Service Dog Standards Service Dog Standards features: · Free for trainers and handlers forever · Public profile page for service dog handlers with a secure resume · Business listings for dog trainers and breeders · Robust tools to manage service dog puppy candidates, graduates, washouts and more · Manage multiple service animals and their status · Secure training and ownership history · Clear explanation of expectations for service dog trainers and handlers · Service Dog Standards Public Access Test · Service Dog Standards Training and Behavior Standards · Template and guidance for getting a physician letter · Information to help the public better understand the complexities of Service Dogs A service dog training resume may include: · Passing a Public Access Test · A trained task list · Detailed digital or

In the United States, every Service Dog handler enjoys the right to travel with their Service Dog. However, finding straightforward information about airline policies and requirements, international laws, TSA regulations, security checkpoints, and other commonly encountered situations isn't easy! To help you prepare you for your trip, we've compiled Service Dog travel tips, tricks, hacks, guidelines, and resources. Terminology note: U.S. Federal law includes miniature horses in the list of allowable Assistance Animal species. Miniature horses trained as Assistance Animals usually provide either guide services or brace and mobility support. Since the majority of Assistance Animal handlers partner with a dog, we usually utilize the term "Service Dog" instead of the more universal "Service Animal." However, any time you see "Service Dog," you could replace it with "Miniature Guide Horse" or "Brace and Mobility Support Horse" seamlessly. Miniature horse users possess identical public access rights to Service Dog teams. Airlines Updated Service Dog and ESA Policies Several Years Ago Throughout the course of 2018, nearly every major domestic airline updated their Service Dog travel policies. Most airlines designed their new protocols to crack down on people using legal loopholes to transport untrained or unsuitable dogs free of charge in the cabin. As such, many of the new rules differ greatly from the "old" airline Service Dog requirements. This is particularly true concerning Emotional Support Animals (ESAs). Many airlines now require an extensive, multi-step approval process for Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals. Some airlines outline different rules or behavioral expectations for different types of Service Dogs. As an example, American Airlines requires Psychiatric Service Dogs to meet the Emotional Support Animal (ESA) requirements instead of the standard Service Dog requirements. Learn More About how Service Animals, Therapy Dogs, and Emotional Support Animals Differ Other types of professional working dogs, like Search and Rescue Dogs and Police K9s, often fly under an airline's established Service Dog policy. However, that's far from universal -- airline working dog policies range from nonexistent to clearly defined with everything in between! All handlers should confirm their airline's Working K9 or Service Dog travel policy several days prior to flying. Airlines accept Service Dogs in Training (SDiTs) at their own discretion. Service Dnimals in Training are not covered by the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) and therefore have no legal rights to fly under any Service Animal policy. Some airlines provide better SDiT policies than others. Service Dog Definitions and Requirements Vary Widely In addition to tightening the rules for

Our canine friends have an enormous number of scent receptors, around 220 million. No wonder, they are legendary for their olfactory sense. How dogs scent medical conditions Dogs can notice the slightest of changes in human bodies caused by various systems including hormonal changes and any volatile organic compounds that our bodies release. The great news is that scientists and dog trainers are finding out how dogs smell the medical conditions in us and trying to figure out how to translate this into healthcare. The following are just a few of the many health conditions that dogs can be trained to help with. Diabetic symptoms Dogs can help people with diabetes realize that they are experiencing blood sugar levels hiking or dropping. Human breath has a natural chemical called isoprene that rises notably when a person with diabetes is going through a period of low blood sugar which dogs can detect. Trained dogs will alert their owners and give them time to take their insulin when they see that their blood test confirms the warning as accurate. Dogs do improve quality of life and safety of their handlers. Detection of cancer Many different types of cancer are detectable to dogs, including breast and skin cancer. Cancerous cells produce a very specific odor. In fact, in late stages of the disease, even human noses can detect it. With a sense of smell researchers estimate is between 10,000 and 100,000 times superior to ours, dogs can detect this smell far earlier in the disease’s progress—even while the cancer is still “in situ,” or has not spread from the site where it was first formed. And remarkably, they don’t need to smell the growth directly. Dogs can detect this scent on waste matter like breath. Neurological disorders and brain disruptions Dogs can be trained to sense disorders that affect your brain and nervous system. The human body sends out hormones through your sweat, and the dogs can pick up the changes in your scent. People prone to migraine attacks will release serotonin a couple of hours before the headache. People suffering from fear and anxiety will release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. Patients with the brain disorder, narcolepsy, suffer from extreme sleepiness and delusions and can fall instantly asleep without warning. Final thoughts We are so familiar with dogs being our pets, our companions and our family that we are only now realizing how much they help us with personal health challenges is