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Taking care of your pet is a big enough challenge for you to deal with. so finding a pet insurance plan that takes care of your pet shouldn’t be. But yet for many pet owners, it seems like finding the right pet insurance turns into a stressful and overwhelming process—likely because there is simply so much information to sift through. To help you spend less time stressing and more time snuggling with your furry friend, we want to help guide you towards finding the right pet insurance for you. It is important to weigh up the pros and cons of the plan you are signing up for, because you want to ensure that your due diligence will mean your pet will get the absolute premium care no matter what happens. Pumpkin pet insurance is leading the way when it comes to providing the ultimate pet insurance for pet owners and is the perfect example of what to look for when signing up for a policy of your own.   Here is the ultimate guide to choosing the right pet insurance for you and your pet.   Step 1: Understand Your Pet Before you even start searching for the right pet insurance for your pet, you need to first understand your pet and its needs. Not all pet insurance plans are the same, so you need to know any specific requirements for care that the plan needs to provide upfront. Make sure you know what your pet’s breed is, their age, any pre-existing conditions or hereditary issues to be on the lookout for. When you know this, it will be much easier to select the pet insurance that is right for them, allowing you to be confident you are getting your money’s worth.   Step 2: Compare Premium Costs As with health insurance for humans, the details of what your premium plan for your pet covers will likely vary based on how much you are paying. So compare what your costs are versus the annual deductibles you need to be prepared to still pay out of pocket, how much you will get reimbursed for various costs and the added benefits of your coverage plans. The best pet insurance plans will reimburse 90% of veterinarian bills if the service provided is covered in the plan, as the whole point of pet insurance is to avoid any costly bills that will put you out of pocket.   Step 3: Evaluate the Customer Service While the main

An estimated 300 dogs assisted in search and rescue efforts after the attacks, that’s according to the 9/11 Memorial & Museum and the American Kennel Club. Many of the working dogs spent hours alongside handlers sniffing through rubble in hopes of finding survivors. Reports suggest most of the dogs only sustained minor injuries during their efforts: mainly cuts and scrapes to their paw pads. Here are 10 notable canines who helped others at the World Trade Center. MAIN PHOTO: Members of Pennsylvania Task Force One at Ground Zero: (from left) Chris Selfridge and Riley, Bobbie Snyder and Willow, Cindy Otto, Rose DeLuca and Logan, and John Gilkey and Bear. Roselle Roselle was sleeping under her owner, Michael Hingson’s, desk when a plane hit the first tower 15 floors above them. The three-year-old was Michael’s fifth guide dog, and helped her owner escape the building through smoke and crumbling debris via staircase B. She led her owner and 30 other people down 1,463 steps from the 78th floor out of the tower, which took over an hour. As they left the building, Tower 2 collapsed. Hingson later said: "While everyone ran in panic, Roselle remained totally focused on her job, while debris fell around us, and even hit us, Roselle stayed calm." The brave dog then led her owner to the safety of a subway station, where they helped a woman who had been blinded by falling debris. Salty Another guide dog, Salty, was on the 71st floor with his owner, Omar Rivera, when the hijacked plane hit the World Trade Center. Rivera recalled how they tried escaping down the nearest flight of stairs, but it was filled with smoke and became very hot and he thought it was too much for Salty, so let go of his harness so the dog could head down alone. Omar said he tried to let the dog go, but Salty refused and guided him to safety. Both Salty and Roselle were awarded a joint Dickin Medal, a British medal awarded to animals that have displayed "conspicuous gallantry or devotion to duty while serving or associated with any branch of the Armed Forces or Civil Defence Units". The award is commonly referred to as "the animals' Victoria Cross" Sirius Explosive detection dog Sirius was the only police dog to die in the 9/11 attack. The K9 employee was working with the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey Police Department with

Our canine friends have an enormous number of scent receptors, around 220 million. No wonder, they are legendary for their olfactory sense. How dogs scent medical conditions Dogs can notice the slightest of changes in human bodies caused by various systems including hormonal changes and any volatile organic compounds that our bodies release. The great news is that scientists and dog trainers are finding out how dogs smell the medical conditions in us and trying to figure out how to translate this into healthcare. The following are just a few of the many health conditions that dogs can be trained to help with. Diabetic symptoms Dogs can help people with diabetes realize that they are experiencing blood sugar levels hiking or dropping. Human breath has a natural chemical called isoprene that rises notably when a person with diabetes is going through a period of low blood sugar which dogs can detect. Trained dogs will alert their owners and give them time to take their insulin when they see that their blood test confirms the warning as accurate. Dogs do improve quality of life and safety of their handlers. Detection of cancer Many different types of cancer are detectable to dogs, including breast and skin cancer. Cancerous cells produce a very specific odor. In fact, in late stages of the disease, even human noses can detect it. With a sense of smell researchers estimate is between 10,000 and 100,000 times superior to ours, dogs can detect this smell far earlier in the disease’s progress—even while the cancer is still “in situ,” or has not spread from the site where it was first formed. And remarkably, they don’t need to smell the growth directly. Dogs can detect this scent on waste matter like breath. Neurological disorders and brain disruptions Dogs can be trained to sense disorders that affect your brain and nervous system. The human body sends out hormones through your sweat, and the dogs can pick up the changes in your scent. People prone to migraine attacks will release serotonin a couple of hours before the headache. People suffering from fear and anxiety will release the hormones adrenaline and cortisol. Patients with the brain disorder, narcolepsy, suffer from extreme sleepiness and delusions and can fall instantly asleep without warning. Final thoughts We are so familiar with dogs being our pets, our companions and our family that we are only now realizing how much they help us with personal health challenges is