Begin typing your search above and press return to search. Press Esc to cancel.

Featured Tag

  /  Posts tagged "Featured"

In the realm of animal behavior and cognition, the "Eureka Effect" isn't solely a human phenomenon; it extends to our canine companions as well. Ragen T S McGowan's study, "Positive Affect and Learning: exploring the 'Eureka Effect' in dogs," delves into the emotional responses of dogs to problem-solving tasks and their subsequent reactions to rewards. Understanding how dogs experience positive affective states in response to their own achievements opens new avenues for training, especially in the realm of service dogs. Unveiling Canine Emotional Responses Service dogs play a vital role in assisting individuals with disabilities, providing support, companionship, and independence. Training these dogs requires a deep understanding of their behavior, cognition, and emotional responses. McGowan's study sheds light on how the Eureka Effect can be harnessed to enhance training methodologies for service dogs. Experimental Design: Understanding Canine Reactions The study involved twelve beagles, each assigned to matched pairs, serving as both experimental and control animals during different phases of the experiment. The dogs were trained to perform distinct operant tasks and exposed to various rewards: food, human contact, and dog contact. Crucially, the experiment utilized a yoked control design to separate emotional responses to problem-solving from reactions to rewards. Emotional Responses to Rewards: Unraveling Dog Behavior Experimental dogs were granted immediate access to rewards upon completing operant tasks, while control dogs received rewards after a delay equal to their matched partner's latency. The results were illuminating: experimental dogs exhibited signs of excitement—increased tail wagging, and activity—in response to their achievements. In contrast, control dogs displayed signs of frustration, such as chewing the operant device, due to the unpredictability of the situation. Tail Wagging and Positive Affective States Furthermore, the intensity of emotional response varied depending on the type of reward, with food eliciting the greatest response and interaction with another dog eliciting the least. This finding underscores the importance of understanding reward preferences in service dog training, and tailoring reinforcement strategies to maximize positive affective states. Integrating the Eureka Effect in Service Dog Training Harnessing the Eureka Effect in training service dogs involves creating environments that foster problem-solving opportunities and positive emotional responses. Tail wagging emerges as a valuable indicator of a dog's positive affective state, signaling moments of achievement and satisfaction. Leveraging Emotional Dynamics for Training Success Integrating the principles of the Eureka Effect into service dog training programs can enhance engagement, motivation, and overall performance. By leveraging dogs' innate drive to solve problems and experience positive emotions, trainers can cultivate

Autumn is well under way and much of the country is awash in color, leaves and crisp air. The beautiful fall conditions make things just perfect for taking a stroll with your Service Dog or Service Dog in Training! Enjoying a walk together isn’t much fun, though, if it’s a constant battle. Here are 5 training tools to help you teach loose leash walking so that everyone can enjoy the nice weather!

In the United States, every Service Dog handler enjoys the right to travel with their Service Dog. However, finding straightforward information about airline policies and requirements, international laws, TSA regulations, security checkpoints, and other commonly encountered situations isn't easy! To help you prepare you for your trip, we've compiled Service Dog travel tips, tricks, hacks, guidelines, and resources. Terminology note: U.S. Federal law includes miniature horses in the list of allowable Assistance Animal species. Miniature horses trained as Assistance Animals usually provide either guide services or brace and mobility support. Since the majority of Assistance Animal handlers partner with a dog, we usually utilize the term "Service Dog" instead of the more universal "Service Animal." However, any time you see "Service Dog," you could replace it with "Miniature Guide Horse" or "Brace and Mobility Support Horse" seamlessly. Miniature horse users possess identical public access rights to Service Dog teams.   Airlines Updated Service Dog and ESA Policies Several Years Ago Throughout the course of 2018, nearly every major domestic airline updated their Service Dog travel policies. Most airlines designed their new protocols to crack down on people using legal loopholes to transport untrained or unsuitable dogs free of charge in the cabin. As such, many of the new rules differ greatly from the "old" airline Service Dog requirements. This is particularly true concerning Emotional Support Animals (ESAs). Many airlines now require an extensive, multi-step approval process for Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals. Some airlines outline different rules or behavioral expectations for different types of Service Dogs. As an example, American Airlines requires Psychiatric Service Dogs to meet the Emotional Support Animal (ESA) requirements instead of the standard Service Dog requirements. Learn More About how Service Animals, Therapy Dogs, and Emotional Support Animals Differ Other types of professional working dogs, like Search and Rescue Dogs and Police K9s, often fly under an airline's established Service Dog policy. However, that's far from universal -- airline working dog policies range from nonexistent to clearly defined with everything in between! All handlers should confirm their airline's Working K9 or Service Dog travel policy several days prior to flying. Airlines accept Service Dogs in Training (SDiTs) at their own discretion. Service Dnimals in Training are not covered by the Air Carrier Access Act (ACAA) and therefore have no legal rights to fly under any Service Animal policy. Some airlines provide better SDiT policies than others.   Service Dog Definitions and Requirements Vary Widely In addition to tightening the rules for

Many people have a vague sense of awareness that Service Dogs "help" their person and that they're allowed to be in public, but there's a lot more to Service Dog handlers and teams than meets the eye.

With any relationship, bonding provides the foundation upon which everything else rests. A new Service Dog partnership isn't any different. Proper bonding from the very beginning allows teams to move forward with confidence, both for work and training. Keep reading to learn tips and ideas that facilitate relationship building with your canine partner. Note: These bonding tips do not replace the official bonding protocol(s) provided by your Service Dog's organization or program. Always follow the guidelines and procedures required by the organization placing your Service Dog. These tips are meant to supplement or enhance other bonding protocols. In particular, owner trainers, Service Dog candidate evaluators, and others in similar situations might benefit from the ideas presented. Additionally, established Service Dog teams can utilize the bonding tips to help build or rebuild their team's focus and performance. Bond (noun, verb) - (1) the formation of a close relationship; (2) the attaching of one thing to another; (3) to join one thing securely to another; (4) a strong force of attraction holding one thing to another Common Service Dog Bonding Fear: "What If My New Service Dog Doesn't Like Me?!" New Service Dog handlers often worry about whether or not their new Service Dog likes them. Early interactions between dog and human frequently contribute to this fear since, in the beginning, many Service Dogs focus on their trainer and ignore the new handler. Furthermore, a fledgling Service Dog team's first few weeks together usually involves many mishaps, miscommunications, and misadventures. Tackling this fear requires new Service Dog handlers and organization placement specialists to remember something very simple: the newly graduated Service Dog and brand new handler likely do not know each other yet. For evaluators and owner trainers, the same holds true -- all new candidates and Service Dogs in Training (SDiTs) start as strangers. Bonding Requires Building a Relationship Like any relationship, going from "stranger" to "acquaintance" to "friend" to "partner" involves getting to know each other. In the beginning, new Service Dog teams learn each partner's likes and dislikes. They learn about preferred schedules and how to interact with each other. The human half of the team learns how to communicate with their dog. Likewise, the recently partnered Service Dog masters their new handler's nuances in speech, delivery, and body language. Until the two learn to reliably convey information, cues, needs, and desires, they aren't truly a team. In other words, until the new Service Dog and handler know each other,

Federal law stipulates that a Service Animal is "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability" and that a Service Dog teams are allowed to enter areas where the public is normally allowed to go. However, a Service Dog team's civil rights may be occasionally challenged by well-meaning people trying to keep pets out of the establishment. While stressful, these challenges are typically easy to handle. Sometimes, though, a little more work is required.

Whether you're looking for a new apartment new home with your service dog or pet, this article will walk you through the steps to finding the perfect pet-friendly apartment. It covers things like ensuring your new home is on a quiet residential street, breed restrictions, and what to look out for. In addition, it will give you tips for checking out your neighbors' pets and negotiating a lease with the landlord.   Make sure the environment is safe When you move to a new place with pets, it is important to check the breed restrictions to see if you can bring your pet with you. Some San Jose pet friendly apartments communities do not allow certain dog breeds and will exercise restraint if the animal is too aggressive. It is also important to know about the age of the dog to make sure the new environment is safe for your furry friend. Here are some common breed restrictions: Before you get your new place, you need to research the new state laws to find out if there are any dog vaccination or licensing requirements.   Honesty with landlords One way to avoid problems in renting a new home with your service dog or pet is, to be honest with your landlord. Not only is it advisable to be upfront about the nature of your pet, but it will also make your landlord more comfortable with your decision. When discussing a pet deposit, be sure to fully understand its terms and conditions. By being honest with your landlord, you can avoid any unpleasant surprises during your stay and also save money in the long run. Showing your landlord a vet's letter confirming that your pet is well-trained will show your landlord that you've taken good care of it. Unless you have a service dog, you should also ask about pet deposits and pet rent. Pets can cause damage to your property so it's advisable to protect your property by purchasing insurance that covers these costs.   Service dogs are not pets Under the law, Service Dogs are considered medical equipment and therefore are exempt from no-pet housing and breed restrictions, however being considerate will go a long way in making your new home experience more pleasant. It's not unusual for a landlord or HOA to request a letter from a prospective tenant's physician stating their need for a Service Dog, however physicians can't verify training or testify to the behavior of the

People have been made aware of the increased risk that their furry canine friend would be prone to tick-borne diseases in the past years. Most of us are probably aware that ticks numerous diseased is connected to fleas and ticks; nevertheless, you might not be aware that this pest number continues to grow in our surroundings has increased. Consequently, your pets will probably become infected by a flea or tick. Various variables have something to do with the dramatic surge in tick reproduction. Ticks are very active in summer. Therefore, tick-related sickness is primarily distributed during hot seasons. Ticks, however, have been shown to breed year-round in several regions because of warmer temperatures. Furthermore, the continuous growth of our population and the creation of new homes in forested locations increased the potential of tick infestation in our pets. In addition, more people are taking their pets outside in high-trafficked areas, increasing their exposure to parasites. Ticks and fleas can transmit various potentially fatal infections like ehrlichiosis, rocky mountain disease, and much more. Furthermore, Minor complications can happen if not treated promptly and properly, so watch your dog carefully. If you see that your dog is not behaving normally, you need to bring them to the nearest vet so that they can address the condition of your dog. Ticks can infect dogs with serious and sometimes fatal diseases. Continue reading to learn everything about ticks on dogs as well as keeping them safe.   What is a Tick? Ticks are a common parasite that feeds on their hosts' blood and can transmit numerous diseases in dogs. Ticks multiply by attaching themselves to the host and then mate to multiply, and larvae emerge from the eggs, at which point they begin looking for your dog. Once this tiny critter attaches to your dog, inserting its mouth parts into your pet's skin, it will begin to feed on your pet's blood flow. Once hooked to your pet's skin, ticks will not leave until they are satisfied, which can take many days. Ticks frequently go for regions with crevasses. This typically comprises ear crevices, inside the legs, in between legs and toes. Ticks are a common pest in lots of places, and eliminating them would be impossible; preventing them from getting in our area is as close to the possible task.   Common Types of Ticks in Dogs Below are the most common ticks in dogs. These ticks are the most common

Introducing new gear to your Service Dog can be stressful for both you and your dog, but it really doesn’t have to be. Here are 10 tips that will help make the process easier – on both of you.

People often believe Service Dogs and ESAs are the same things, with similar access rights. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Emotional Support Animals aren't Service Dogs, they don't have public access, and they don't require specialized training. Keep reading and dig into the nitty-gritty facts about ESAs.   Emotional Support Dogs Don't Have Public Access Contrary to popular belief and pop culture, Emotional Support Animals don't possess public access rights. They do not belong in grocery stores, restaurants, or in places of public accommodation. This includes hospitals, doctors offices, pharmacies, and other medical environments. Nothing grants ESAs public access rights, not even a vest or an ID card, because, under U.S. federal law, ESAs do not have public access rights. Period. End of story. ESAs may accompany their handlers only in places where pets are allowed, with a couple of notable exceptions.   ESAs Have Access to Housing Both Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals are permitted to live with their handlers under federal housing law. It’s not unusual for a landlord to require a physician letter or other form of documentation from those who use Service Dogs. ESA status does not exempt someone for being responsible for any damages caused by their ESA.   ESAs Don't Require Specialized Training Unlike Service Dogs, Emotional Support Animals don't require specialized training however they must be capable of working safely, which means no timidity, no fear, no aggression, no out of control behavior, and no excessive vocalizing.   Emotional Support Animals Aren't Service Dogs Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are an important type of working dog, but they are not Service Dogs. Let's say it again for the people in the back -- ESAs differ from Service Dogs. While ESAs add value to their handler's lives, legally, they have the same rights as pets, unlike Service Dogs. Service Dogs receive accommodation under America's disability access laws, whereas ESAs do not. To learn more about the difference between therapy dogs, Service Dogs, ESAs, and other working dogs, check out this article.   Emotional Support Animals Are Pets Legally, ESAs are pets. They're allowed in no-pets-housing but outside of that, ESAs are simply pets. Someone gets an ESA when their doctor, psychiatrist, or therapist says animal companionship would benefit them and writes a letter documenting that fact. Most ESAs were simply family pets before their handler obtained a letter of necessity from a medical caregiver.         .