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Federal law stipulates that a Service Animal is "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability" and that a Service Dog teams are allowed to enter areas where the public is normally allowed to go. However, a Service Dog team's civil rights may be occasionally challenged by well-meaning people trying to keep pets out of the establishment. While stressful, these challenges are typically easy to handle. Sometimes, though, a little more work is required.

Whether you're looking for a new apartment new home with your service dog or pet, this article will walk you through the steps to finding the perfect pet-friendly apartment. It covers things like ensuring your new home is on a quiet residential street, breed restrictions, and what to look out for. In addition, it will give you tips for checking out your neighbors' pets and negotiating a lease with the landlord.   Make sure the environment is safe When you move to a new place with pets, it is important to check the breed restrictions to see if you can bring your pet with you. Some San Jose pet friendly apartments communities do not allow certain dog breeds and will exercise restraint if the animal is too aggressive. It is also important to know about the age of the dog to make sure the new environment is safe for your furry friend. Here are some common breed restrictions: Before you get your new place, you need to research the new state laws to find out if there are any dog vaccination or licensing requirements.   Honesty with landlords One way to avoid problems in renting a new home with your service dog or pet is, to be honest with your landlord. Not only is it advisable to be upfront about the nature of your pet, but it will also make your landlord more comfortable with your decision. When discussing a pet deposit, be sure to fully understand its terms and conditions. By being honest with your landlord, you can avoid any unpleasant surprises during your stay and also save money in the long run. Showing your landlord a vet's letter confirming that your pet is well-trained will show your landlord that you've taken good care of it. Unless you have a service dog, you should also ask about pet deposits and pet rent. Pets can cause damage to your property so it's advisable to protect your property by purchasing insurance that covers these costs.   Service dogs are not pets Under the law, Service Dogs are considered medical equipment and therefore are exempt from no-pet housing and breed restrictions, however being considerate will go a long way in making your new home experience more pleasant. It's not unusual for a landlord or HOA to request a letter from a prospective tenant's physician stating their need for a Service Dog, however physicians can't verify training or testify to the behavior of the

People have been made aware of the increased risk that their furry canine friend would be prone to tick-borne diseases in the past years. Most of us are probably aware that ticks numerous diseased is connected to fleas and ticks; nevertheless, you might not be aware that this pest number continues to grow in our surroundings has increased. Consequently, your pets will probably become infected by a flea or tick. Various variables have something to do with the dramatic surge in tick reproduction. Ticks are very active in summer. Therefore, tick-related sickness is primarily distributed during hot seasons. Ticks, however, have been shown to breed year-round in several regions because of warmer temperatures. Furthermore, the continuous growth of our population and the creation of new homes in forested locations increased the potential of tick infestation in our pets. In addition, more people are taking their pets outside in high-trafficked areas, increasing their exposure to parasites. Ticks and fleas can transmit various potentially fatal infections like ehrlichiosis, rocky mountain disease, and much more. Furthermore, Minor complications can happen if not treated promptly and properly, so watch your dog carefully. If you see that your dog is not behaving normally, you need to bring them to the nearest vet so that they can address the condition of your dog. Ticks can infect dogs with serious and sometimes fatal diseases. Continue reading to learn everything about ticks on dogs as well as keeping them safe.   What is a Tick? Ticks are a common parasite that feeds on their hosts' blood and can transmit numerous diseases in dogs. Ticks multiply by attaching themselves to the host and then mate to multiply, and larvae emerge from the eggs, at which point they begin looking for your dog. Once this tiny critter attaches to your dog, inserting its mouth parts into your pet's skin, it will begin to feed on your pet's blood flow. Once hooked to your pet's skin, ticks will not leave until they are satisfied, which can take many days. Ticks frequently go for regions with crevasses. This typically comprises ear crevices, inside the legs, in between legs and toes. Ticks are a common pest in lots of places, and eliminating them would be impossible; preventing them from getting in our area is as close to the possible task.   Common Types of Ticks in Dogs Below are the most common ticks in dogs. These ticks are the most common

Introducing new gear to your Service Dog can be stressful for both you and your dog, but it really doesn’t have to be. Here are 10 tips that will help make the process easier – on both of you.

People often believe Service Dogs and ESAs are the same things, with similar access rights. However, nothing could be further from the truth. Emotional Support Animals aren't Service Dogs, they don't have public access, and they don't require specialized training. Keep reading and dig into the nitty-gritty facts about ESAs.   Emotional Support Dogs Don't Have Public Access Contrary to popular belief and pop culture, Emotional Support Animals don't possess public access rights. They do not belong in grocery stores, restaurants, or in places of public accommodation. This includes hospitals, doctors offices, pharmacies, and other medical environments. Nothing grants ESAs public access rights, not even a vest or an ID card, because, under U.S. federal law, ESAs do not have public access rights. Period. End of story. ESAs may accompany their handlers only in places where pets are allowed, with a couple of notable exceptions.   ESAs Have Access to Housing Both Service Dogs and Emotional Support Animals are permitted to live with their handlers under federal housing law. It’s not unusual for a landlord to require a physician letter or other form of documentation from those who use Service Dogs. ESA status does not exempt someone for being responsible for any damages caused by their ESA.   ESAs Don't Require Specialized Training Unlike Service Dogs, Emotional Support Animals don't require specialized training however they must be capable of working safely, which means no timidity, no fear, no aggression, no out of control behavior, and no excessive vocalizing.   Emotional Support Animals Aren't Service Dogs Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are an important type of working dog, but they are not Service Dogs. Let's say it again for the people in the back -- ESAs differ from Service Dogs. While ESAs add value to their handler's lives, legally, they have the same rights as pets, unlike Service Dogs. Service Dogs receive accommodation under America's disability access laws, whereas ESAs do not. To learn more about the difference between therapy dogs, Service Dogs, ESAs, and other working dogs, check out this article.   Emotional Support Animals Are Pets Legally, ESAs are pets. They're allowed in no-pets-housing but outside of that, ESAs are simply pets. Someone gets an ESA when their doctor, psychiatrist, or therapist says animal companionship would benefit them and writes a letter documenting that fact. Most ESAs were simply family pets before their handler obtained a letter of necessity from a medical caregiver.         .                  

Uber and Lyft have come on the market as an alternative to traditional taxi services. Using a smartphone app, these services instead allow anyone (after initial screening) to use their personal vehicles to provide rides to those who request them through the app. One of the biggest perks of using these services, is that often riders pay less than they would pay had they taken a traditional cab.

It can be difficult to take care of a pet with a terminal illness — and that difficulty is compounded if you are disabled and have a Service Dog. What are some things you should keep in mind if you have a terminally ill pet?   Terminal illness is heartbreaking for you as a pet owner. Illness and its symptoms can vary, and for some pets, a terminal disease may be something they live with for many months or years. Particularly if the illness is degenerative, it can make life very difficult for both you and your pet. How can you, as the pet owner, help your pet as much as possible? Here are a few things you can do to make life a little easier for your terminally ill pet.   Always Stay Up to Date With All Medications and Other Regimens One of the most important and caring things you can do is to stay up to date with your pet’s medications and any other regimens your veterinarian has prescribed. These are the things that will keep your pet feeling more comfortable in the last chapter of their life. If your veterinarian has prescribed something specific for your pet, make sure you stay up to date with it. Also, if you notice any changes in your pet’s health or behavior you should check with your vet.   Avoid Stressing Your Pet Out Unduly Stress can have serious negative health impacts for both humans and pets, and if your pet has a terminal condition, you need to be as careful as possible to avoid stressing your pet out and putting extra difficulties on your pet’s health. Stressing your pet out is something you want to avoid if at all possible. This may mean reducing stressors in your home in general, like giving your pet a quiet space in the house that’s just for them, like a special bed or area.   Look into Diet and Exercise Options You may need to consider special diet and exercise options for your pet. Feeding schedules may need to be adjusted to accommodate medication requirements. Your pet may benefit from some exercise or stimulation to encourage movement. Talk to your veterinarian about what you can do to best manage your pet’s diet and food requirements, and also ask what kinds of exercise might be best for your pet.   Keep Track of All Symptoms and Concerns It’s important that you’re always keeping track of the symptoms that

How disabled is disabled enough? It's a short question that can be plagued with a variety of different meanings and interpretations. However, the answer to the question is of extreme importance, because while being 'disabled' can provide benefits for some, not being 'disabled enough', can cause an immense struggle for others.

Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs aren’t the only dogs in the world who do amazing, life-changing work, but they are one of the few types of working dogs clearly defined and protected by United States federal law. Too many people don’t understand the differences between many types of working dogs, though, and it’s time to clear up some of the confusion.

As a dog owner, you may find yourself facing many challenges. You have to feed your dog well and ensure it gets plenty of exercises, but did you know that there are other things you need to watch out for? One common problem for pedigree dogs is inbreeding. This can lead to health issues down the line. This blog post will discuss some of the potential problems with pedigree dogs and what owners can do about it!   Problems for Owners of Pedigree Dogs Inbreeding The most common issue with pedigree dogs is inbreeding. Inbreeding occurs when the same pair of animals breed together repeatedly over a short period. This can lead to undesirable changes within the gene pool of an animal population. These deviations are harmful and cause problems for the entire lineage, leading to health issues. Pedigree dogs are particularly susceptible to inbreeding because of the small gene pools used to create them. Hip Dysplasia Another common problem is hip dysplasia when the joints between the ball and socket get deformed or malformed. These dogs often suffer from severe arthritis later on in life, making movement difficult and painful. Although some breeds are more prone to hip dysplasia than others, all species can be victims. Eye Problems Many pedigree dogs are also prone to various eye problems. These can include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and glaucoma. All of these conditions can lead to blindness if left untreated. Skin Disorders Many pedigree dogs also suffer from skin disorders. This can be due to various reasons, such as allergies, environmental factors, and genetics. Some common skin disorders include dermatitis, seborrhea, and mange. Heart Problems The trouble with the heart is also common among pedigree dogs. These problems may include congenital defects, infectious cardiomyopathy, and various heart conditions. The most common heart problem in dogs is subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS), which reduces the blood flow to the heart. SAS can lead to sudden death if left untreated. Cancer Cancer is also common among pedigree dogs. One type of cancer that has become more prevalent in recent years is hemangiosarcoma, which affects the blood vessels within an organ or tissue and often leads to internal bleeding and tumor development. Other forms of cancer that are particularly prevalent in pedigree dogs include lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and mammary carcinoma.   How Can I Help My Pedigree Dog? There are a few things you can do to help your pedigree dog stay healthy. Consider enrolling your dog in a