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Service Dog Tag

  /  Posts tagged "Service Dog"

Federal law stipulates that a Service Animal is "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability" and that a Service Dog teams are allowed to enter areas where the public is normally allowed to go. However, a Service Dog team's civil rights may be occasionally challenged by well-meaning people trying to keep pets out of the establishment. While stressful, these challenges are typically easy to handle. Sometimes, though, a little more work is required.

Whether you're looking for a new apartment new home with your service dog or pet, this article will walk you through the steps to finding the perfect pet-friendly apartment. It covers things like ensuring your new home is on a quiet residential street, breed restrictions, and what to look out for. In addition, it will give you tips for checking out your neighbors' pets and negotiating a lease with the landlord.   Make sure the environment is safe When you move to a new place with pets, it is important to check the breed restrictions to see if you can bring your pet with you. Some San Jose pet friendly apartments communities do not allow certain dog breeds and will exercise restraint if the animal is too aggressive. It is also important to know about the age of the dog to make sure the new environment is safe for your furry friend. Here are some common breed restrictions: Before you get your new place, you need to research the new state laws to find out if there are any dog vaccination or licensing requirements.   Honesty with landlords One way to avoid problems in renting a new home with your service dog or pet is, to be honest with your landlord. Not only is it advisable to be upfront about the nature of your pet, but it will also make your landlord more comfortable with your decision. When discussing a pet deposit, be sure to fully understand its terms and conditions. By being honest with your landlord, you can avoid any unpleasant surprises during your stay and also save money in the long run. Showing your landlord a vet's letter confirming that your pet is well-trained will show your landlord that you've taken good care of it. Unless you have a service dog, you should also ask about pet deposits and pet rent. Pets can cause damage to your property so it's advisable to protect your property by purchasing insurance that covers these costs.   Service dogs are not pets Under the law, Service Dogs are considered medical equipment and therefore are exempt from no-pet housing and breed restrictions, however being considerate will go a long way in making your new home experience more pleasant. It's not unusual for a landlord or HOA to request a letter from a prospective tenant's physician stating their need for a Service Dog, however physicians can't verify training or testify to the behavior of the

People have been made aware of the increased risk that their furry canine friend would be prone to tick-borne diseases in the past years. Most of us are probably aware that ticks numerous diseased is connected to fleas and ticks; nevertheless, you might not be aware that this pest number continues to grow in our surroundings has increased. Consequently, your pets will probably become infected by a flea or tick. Various variables have something to do with the dramatic surge in tick reproduction. Ticks are very active in summer. Therefore, tick-related sickness is primarily distributed during hot seasons. Ticks, however, have been shown to breed year-round in several regions because of warmer temperatures. Furthermore, the continuous growth of our population and the creation of new homes in forested locations increased the potential of tick infestation in our pets. In addition, more people are taking their pets outside in high-trafficked areas, increasing their exposure to parasites. Ticks and fleas can transmit various potentially fatal infections like ehrlichiosis, rocky mountain disease, and much more. Furthermore, Minor complications can happen if not treated promptly and properly, so watch your dog carefully. If you see that your dog is not behaving normally, you need to bring them to the nearest vet so that they can address the condition of your dog. Ticks can infect dogs with serious and sometimes fatal diseases. Continue reading to learn everything about ticks on dogs as well as keeping them safe.   What is a Tick? Ticks are a common parasite that feeds on their hosts' blood and can transmit numerous diseases in dogs. Ticks multiply by attaching themselves to the host and then mate to multiply, and larvae emerge from the eggs, at which point they begin looking for your dog. Once this tiny critter attaches to your dog, inserting its mouth parts into your pet's skin, it will begin to feed on your pet's blood flow. Once hooked to your pet's skin, ticks will not leave until they are satisfied, which can take many days. Ticks frequently go for regions with crevasses. This typically comprises ear crevices, inside the legs, in between legs and toes. Ticks are a common pest in lots of places, and eliminating them would be impossible; preventing them from getting in our area is as close to the possible task.   Common Types of Ticks in Dogs Below are the most common ticks in dogs. These ticks are the most common

How disabled is disabled enough? It's a short question that can be plagued with a variety of different meanings and interpretations. However, the answer to the question is of extreme importance, because while being 'disabled' can provide benefits for some, not being 'disabled enough', can cause an immense struggle for others.

Service Dogs and Assistance Dogs aren’t the only dogs in the world who do amazing, life-changing work, but they are one of the few types of working dogs clearly defined and protected by United States federal law. Too many people don’t understand the differences between many types of working dogs, though, and it’s time to clear up some of the confusion.

It's that time of year again: Christmas is over! You may be looking for new ways to spoil your dog in the new year and there are many things to do to make them feel special, now that you have some more time to spend focusing on them. It's important not to forget your furry friend during the mew year! In this blog post, we'll be discussing five great ideas on how you can ensure your pup doesn't feel left out.   Ways of Keeping Your Dog Happy in the New Year 1. Ensure Your Dog is Well-Groomed One of the best ways to ensure your dog doesn't get left out is by grooming them. There's nothing worse than a pet that looks unkempt during one of the most festive times of the year, so you must keep up with their grooming routine. This includes: Brushing their teeth Trimming their nails Keeping them clean overall An excellent way to ensure your dog always looks its best is using quality pet shampoo. Not only will this keep your pup clean, but it will also leave them smelling wonderful.   2. Prepare Some Treats The best types of treats you can get for your pup are ones that promote healthy eating habits. These include natural dog chews, which support a healthy lifestyle and taste delicious. Your dog will love getting treats like these during the new year, and you'll love knowing that they're good for them!   3. Get Them a New Toy Why not get your dog one of the new toys that were released for Christmas last year that now have a discounted price in the January sales? There are many types of toys available for you. It can be hard to know which one is right for your pup. One of the best toys you can get your dog during this time is a plush toy. These types of toys are great because they're soft and cuddly, making them perfect for snuggling with on those cold nights.   4. Get Them a New Bed Your dog deserves the best, and that includes their fancy new bed. You can find some great products on eBay or Amazon that your pup will love. Another type of bed you might want to consider getting your dog is a memory foam bed. They are comfortable and reduce pressure points and relieve pain in your pup's joints.   5. Take Them for a Walk One of the best things you can do to keep

As a dog owner, you may find yourself facing many challenges. You have to feed your dog well and ensure it gets plenty of exercises, but did you know that there are other things you need to watch out for? One common problem for pedigree dogs is inbreeding. This can lead to health issues down the line. This blog post will discuss some of the potential problems with pedigree dogs and what owners can do about it!   Problems for Owners of Pedigree Dogs Inbreeding The most common issue with pedigree dogs is inbreeding. Inbreeding occurs when the same pair of animals breed together repeatedly over a short period. This can lead to undesirable changes within the gene pool of an animal population. These deviations are harmful and cause problems for the entire lineage, leading to health issues. Pedigree dogs are particularly susceptible to inbreeding because of the small gene pools used to create them. Hip Dysplasia Another common problem is hip dysplasia when the joints between the ball and socket get deformed or malformed. These dogs often suffer from severe arthritis later on in life, making movement difficult and painful. Although some breeds are more prone to hip dysplasia than others, all species can be victims. Eye Problems Many pedigree dogs are also prone to various eye problems. These can include progressive retinal atrophy, cataracts, and glaucoma. All of these conditions can lead to blindness if left untreated. Skin Disorders Many pedigree dogs also suffer from skin disorders. This can be due to various reasons, such as allergies, environmental factors, and genetics. Some common skin disorders include dermatitis, seborrhea, and mange. Heart Problems The trouble with the heart is also common among pedigree dogs. These problems may include congenital defects, infectious cardiomyopathy, and various heart conditions. The most common heart problem in dogs is subvalvular aortic stenosis (SAS), which reduces the blood flow to the heart. SAS can lead to sudden death if left untreated. Cancer Cancer is also common among pedigree dogs. One type of cancer that has become more prevalent in recent years is hemangiosarcoma, which affects the blood vessels within an organ or tissue and often leads to internal bleeding and tumor development. Other forms of cancer that are particularly prevalent in pedigree dogs include lymphoma, osteosarcoma, and mammary carcinoma.   How Can I Help My Pedigree Dog? There are a few things you can do to help your pedigree dog stay healthy. Consider enrolling your dog in a

Hearing Dogs alert their hard of hearing or deaf handlers to important sounds in the environment. Commonly trained sounds include approaching cars, fire alarms, sirens, dropped keys, and the handler's name. Read on to learn all about Hearing Dogs, where they come from, what they do, and how they're trained! Bonus: Read our step-by-step training guide at the end of this post to learn how to introduce new sounds to a Hearing Dog in Training.    Hearing Dog Basics Hearing Dogs, also known as Hearing Alert Dogs, Hearing Ear Dogs, or Signal Dogs, partner with D/deaf and hard of hearing people of all ages. These specialized Service Dogs undergo countless hours of task training, during which they learn to recognize a variety of sounds and how to notify their handler of the sound. Before being accepted for Hearing Dog training, trainers test the canine candidate for sound temperament, good physical structure, and a keen, curious, social personality. Upon passing their initial temperament and aptitude evaluation, new Hearing Dogs in Training formally begin their Service Dog foundation training. They learn manners, basic and advanced obedience, and public access skills. They work on focusing through distractions and on building impulse control. After these special dogs master the basics, they begin their advanced training. For Hearing Dogs, this consists of "soundwork," or the process of learning sounds and the associated alert behaviors. Some Hearing Dogs work for people with multiple disabilities. These multi-purpose Service Dogs may be cross-trained for other Service Dog jobs and undergo additional task training. Good Hearing Dogs undergo hundreds of hours of specialized training and socialization before ever entering the field. Once teams graduate from training, they continue building their skills and bonding as a pair.   Who Trains Hearing Dogs? In the United States, Hearing Dogs can be trained by a professional organization or program, or their future handler can train them. If the handler self-trains their own Service Dog, it's called "owner training." U.S. Federal law protects the public access rights of professionally trained Service Dogs and owner trained Service Dogs the same way -- there are no differences. Both types of Service Dogs enjoy the same level of protection. Several organizations in the United States train and place Hearing Dogs. Each has their own set of requirements and guidelines for receiving a Hearing Dog. These are a few of the most well-known programs: International Hearing Dog, Inc. - They've trained over 1,300 Hearing Dogs and have been in

When it comes to Service Dogs or Service Dogs in Training with public access, there are definite things Service Dogs in public should and should not do. Learn more about how well-trained Service Dogs should appear and what U.S. Service Dog law says about dogs who don't quite possess the skills necessary to safely work in public

The holiday season is a perfect excuse to grab some hot chocolate and snuggle up on the couch with your Service Dog, Working Dog or pet! Here are some of our favorites that are sure to get you in the holiday spirit. 1. A Dog Named Christmas   A Dog Named Christmas tells the story of Todd, a developmentally delayed 20 year old, who loves animals. When Todd hears that the local animal shelter wants to adopt dogs out for Christmas, Todd is right on board, much to the dismay of his father George. With persistence Todd is eventually given permission to bring home a yellow lab he names Christmas. Little does the family know that Christmas will change their life forever. Check out the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:35     Year: 2009     2. Beethoven's Christmas Adventure Photo Credit: IMBdOur favorite Saint Bernard is back in Beethoven's Christmas Adventure. When Santa's sleigh crashes in a small town and the magic toy bag is stolen, it's up to Beethoven to find the bag and return it to Santa in time for Christmas. Sure to be a family favorite. Watch the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:30     Year: 2011   3. The 12 Dogs of Christmas   The 12 Dogs of Christmas takes place in 1931 in Maine during the Depression and tells the story of a young girl named Emma who uses 12 special dogs to show everyone the true meaning of Christmas. Watch the trailer here. Rating: G     Length: 1:42     Year: 2005     4. 12 Dogs of Christmas: Great Puppy Rescue   The 12 Dogs of Christmas was followed by a sequel titled 12 Dogs of Christmas: Great Puppy Rescue. Emma is back again, but this time follows her quest to save a local puppy orphanage, by putting on a big holiday event.  Watch the trailer here. Rating: PG     Length: 1:42     Year: 2012       5. Buddies Movies   As a follow up to the classic Air Bud movies, Disney released three different buddies movies that the kids will love! The titles are: Santa Buddies (2009), The Search for Santa Paws (2010) and Santa Paws 2 (2012). Click on each of the titles to watch the trailer for each of these movies. Rating: G     Length: Varies     Year: 2010   6. The Dog Who Saved Christmas   When the Bannister's welcome a new dog named Zeus into their home, he doesn't appear to be the guard dog that the family is looking for. But when two burglars break into their house when they are away for the holidays, Zeus sets out to